Lunar New Year

Calculate Lunar New YearThe Lunar New Year

How to determine the lunar New Year.

 Sponsored Links
 ∇

Calculating the Lunar New Year

What is indisputable is the winter solstice on 21st of December.  This is the shortest day in the northern hemisphere.  Logically, the lunar New Year is the first new moon after the solstice, for example:

  • Jan 4th 2011
  • Dec 24th 2011  (Lunar New Year 2012!)
  • Jan 11th 2013
  • Jan 1st 2014 (Lunar moon coincides with calendar New Year).

However, the Chinese take a different view, for them the lunar New Year is the second new moon after the winter solstice.

Calculating 'When is the Chinese New Year'

The fact that the date of Chinese New Year varies within about a month is a clue that it's linked to the new moon.  A rough, and almost infallible guide is that the date of the Chinese New Year falls on the second new moon after the winter solstice.  The winter solstice always falls on December 21st, the next new moon is January 4th, and the second new moon is on February 3rd 2011.

Will and Guy admit that the precise rules for determining 'When is the Chinese New Year', are far more complex.  For example, one problem with any lunar calendar system is that some years there are 13 new moons.  The Chinese deal with this be slotting in an extra intercalary month.

 §

The Chinese Calendar 2014Chinese New Year 2014

Unlike western calendars, the Chinese calendar has names that are repeated every 60 years.  Within the 'Stem-Branch' system is shorter cycle of 12 years denoted by animals:

2014 is the year of the Horse.  It is the jiăwŭ (甲午) year (Wooden Horse). Ji is the first of the ten celestial stems and ăwŭ (Horse) is the seventh of the twelve terrestrial branches and thus 1/7 marks the year of the Horse.

   Rat    Ox    Tiger Rabbit  Dragon Snake Horse Sheep Monkey Rooster Dog  Pig
2008 2009  2010  2011  2012  2013   2014  2015   2016    2017   2018 2007

Calculating 'When is the Chinese New Year in 2014'

The fact that the date of Chinese New Year varies within about a month is a clue that it's linked to the new moon.  A rough, and almost infallible guide is that the Chinese New Year follows the second new moon after the winter solstice.  The winter solstice falls on December 21st, the next new moon is on January 1st 2014, and the second new moon is on January 30th 2014.

Will and Guy admit that the precise rules for determining 'When is the Chinese New Year', are far more complex.  For example, one problem with any lunar calendar system is that some years there are 13 new moons.  The Chinese deal with this by slotting in an extra intercalary month.

 
#

The Chinese Calendar 2015Chinese New Year 2015 - Goat

2015 is the year of the Sheep, but is also know as the year of the Goat, or even the Ram.  It is the yĭ-wèi (乙未) year of the Wooden Sheep. Yĭ is the second of the ten celestial stems and wèi (Sheep) is the eighth of the twelve terrestrial branches.

Unlike western calendars, the Chinese calendar has names that are repeated every 60 years.  Within the 'Stem-Branch' system is shorter cycle of 12 years denoted by animals:

  Rat    Ox    Tiger Rabbit  Dragon Snake Horse  Sheep Monkey Rooster Dog  Pig
2008 2009  2010  2011  2012  2013   2014  2015   2016    2017   2018 2007

Calculating 'When is the Chinese New Year in 2015'

The fact that the date of Chinese New Year varies within about a month is a clue that it's linked to the new moon.  A rough, and almost infallible guide is that the Chinese New Year follows the second new moon after the winter solstice.  The winter solstice always falls on December 21st, the next new moon is on January 20th 2015, and the second new moon is on February 18th 2015.

Please note that there is a new moon on December 21st, but this does not count for calculation purposes.  However, this does mean that February 19th is about the latest day in the year for the Chinese New Year.  As the new year ends on February 7th 2016 this late begining it makes 2015 slightly shorter than most Chinese 'years'.

For The Chinese New Year - The Colour Red and FireworksChinese Valentine's Day 2011

At the Chinese New Year red is important. People wear red clothes, they write poems on red paper, and give children 'luck money' in red envelopes.  The symbolism behind the red colour is fire, and fire burns off bad luck.  As for fireworks one belief is that the cracker jacks and sparks frighten away evil spirits.

After the fireworks at the beginning of the celebration of the Chinese new year, comes the more tranquil Lantern Festival on the last day of the festivities.  Most Lantern parades feature a dragon made of silk and bamboo.  The dancers hold the monstrous dragon aloft on sticks.  Their coordination skills make the dragon appear to dance.

Chinese Phrases

搞笑清洁笑话 in Chinese translates into clean funny jokes.

干净免费笑话,故事图片、视频剪辑 means clean free jokes, stories pictures and video-clips

 

Footnote:
Please write to Will and Guy if you have any interesting articles on calculating the lunar New Year.

If you like this page then please share it with your friends

 


See More About the Chinese New Year Calendar, also Jokes and Funny Stories:

Chinese New Year 2014   • Chinese Day October 1st   • Chinese New Year jokes   • What New Year

Chinese New Year 2015   • Interesting Chinese facts   • Chinese traditional foods   • Chinese food

Chinese Valentine's Day   • Chinese Moon Festival Zhongqiujie   • Chinese New Year Lantern Festival